Airport of the Future 2021

Global Student Competition Shortlist Announced

Fentress Architects is excited to announce the ten shortlisted entries for the 2021 Fentress Global Challenge (FGC), which garnered more than 80 entries from students around the globe. FGC is an annual international student design competition launched in 2011 by Curtis Fentress, FAIA, RIBA that encourages and rewards innovative design in public architecture. This year’s competition challenged students to envision airport mobility in the year 2100.

Students were able to choose between siting the new terminal at an existing airfield—such as at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International (ATL) or Beijing Capital International (PEK)—and a yet undeveloped site—such as in Atafu, Tokelau or Canillo, Andorra.

Entrants explored various modes of transport, including pods for intra-airport transport. Other methods of inter-airport transport proposed included mag-lev cars, drones, hyperloops, hydrofoils, and air-rails. Additionally, several different types of aircraft were studied including anti-gravity, vertical take off, rockets, and spaceships.

Entries were evaluated based upon five criteria, including technology and sustainability. Some submssions specifically envisoned airports able to create their own biofuel from algae and symbiotic bacteria. Others created floating structures that sought to restore coral reefs and ocean ecosystems. Most designs derived shape and form from biomimicry and parametric equations. Many also incorporated gardens, greenhouses, photovoltaic cells, and wind. Artificial intelligence helped enhance several of functions and addressed issues such as COVID-19 and terrorism. Furthermore, 3D printing and modular structures were two of several new building techniques explored.

The 2021 Shortlist

  • AJQ GROUP – Qian Yu, Alexandra Terekhova, Joseph Cook – University of Applied Arts Vienna, Austria
  • Urban Travelator – Dinel Meyepa – Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
  • Astra – Jonathan Liang, Martin He – Columbia University, New York City, USA
  • Decentralized Airport – Tam Dinh – University of Architecture Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
  • Ferreras + Osiberu – Carmina Ferreras, Oluwarotimi Osiberu – North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA
  • Adaptive Antifragile – Gee Yang Tan – Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore
  • The Future Cell – Assem Attia – UACEG, Sofia, Bulgaria
  • AILY – Liyang Wang – Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
  • Synergistic Airport – Baoqi Xiao – University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA
  • The Heathrow Hive – Jack Hastie – University Collge London, UK

A jury of renowned airport architects, directors, planners, and scholars will judge the shortlist virtually. Winners will be announced December 1, 2021. First, Second, and Third Place will recieve a total of $20,000 USD in cash prizes. Additionally, two People’s Choice Awards will be given, which carry a $1,000 USD cash prize, Voting for People’s Choice has already begun on the Fentress Architects Facebook Page at https://www.facebook.com/FentressArch/.

AIA Western Mountain Region Recognizes Fentress Architects

25-Year Award for Denver International Airport’s Passenger Terminal Complex and the Special Recognition Award for Miami Beach Convention Center

The 2021 American Institute of Architects’ (AIA) Western Mountain Region (WMR) Design Awards were presented last Thursday, October 1 at the annual AIA WMR Summit, which was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

­2021 AIA Western Mountain Region Twenty-Five Year Award: Denver International Airport (DEN) Passenger Terminal

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Western Mountain Region selected the Denver International Airport (DEN) Passenger Terminal as the recipient of the 2021 Twenty-Five Year Award. As one of the most prestigious honors for Colorado’s built environment, the award is presented annually to a project that has “significantly influenced design and lifestyle in Colorado” and features a “timeless and enduring design that has created a sense of place” for at least 25 years.

“Our vision for DEN’s Passenger Terminal was to create a memorable design—a gateway to Colorado and the West,” said Curtis Fentress, FAIA, RIBA, Principal in Charge of Design at Fentress Architects. “Twenty five years later, the design continues to transcend time and is known around the world. I would like to thank AIA Colorado Honor Awards Jury, the entire project team, and my former partner Jim Bradburn.”

Completed in 1995, Fentress’ design for DEN’s Jeppesen Terminal stimulated a paradigm shift in the way architects and the public perceive airport design. Previously, airports were conceived as ‘people processors’—nondescript warehouses comprised of low ceilings and dim lighting. Fentress sought to change this notion by creating an airport that serves as a symbol of Denver and a gateway welcoming all to Colorado and the West; architecture as memorable as it is functional.

To create a significant airport, the terminal’s design embodies forms and materials native to the Rocky Mountain region. Peaked roof forms rise 130 to 150 feet, evoking a sense that one has stepped onto the snowcapped mountains that inspired the building’s architecture. This context-driven design marks the first time an airport became a timeless icon of a region through expressive forms.  It inspired the architecture of hundreds of airports worldwide.

2021 AIA Western Mountain Region Special Recognition Award: Miami Beach Convention Center

Miami Beach Convention Center won the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Special Recognition Award for 2021. Located in the heart of the city, the 1950’s-era Miami Beach Convention Center (MBCC) needed a transformation befitting its reputation as a world-class entertainment destination.  The venue has become renown for hosting preeminent annual events including Art Basel and eMERGE Americas. The Fentress team, together with Arquitectonica, mined the surrounding culture and context to create a design that is quintessentially South Florida, and has become a contextual representation of the city.

One of the greatest challenges was harmonizing the 1.4-million-square-foot, grand scale building with the intimacy of human scale to create flexible, intuitive, and daylit spaces. Inspired by undulating ocean waves, exterior façade “fins”—angled aluminum linear forms—filter light to create a dappled effect within the building’s daylit lobbies and pre-function spaces.  This provides visitors with a seamless transition between indoor and outdoor environments. Contextual inspiration was brought inside with colors and patterns that emulate receding water, sea foam, and local coral reef patterns.

Denver Art Museum to Unveil Reimagined Campus on October 24

DENVER, CO—The Denver Art Museum (DAM) will reopen its expanded and reimagined campus to the public with a free general admission day on October 24, 2021, unveiling all eight levels of its iconic Gio Ponti-designed Lanny and Sharon Martin Building (formerly referred to as the North or Ponti Building), which originally opened to the public 50 years ago, and the new Anna and John J. Sie Welcome Center. Part of an overall campus reunification and building renovation project designed by Machado Silvetti and Fentress Architects, the campus reopening coincides with the Martin Building’s 50th anniversary.

“We are looking forward to welcoming our community into new, dynamic spaces this fall, to explore art, world cultures and their own creativity,” said Christoph Heinrich, Frederick and Jan Mayer Director of the DAM.  “For more than three years, the north side of our campus has been undergoing a bold transformation to improve the visitor experience while honoring and preserving the building’s historic architecture. The events of the past year have reaffirmed the importance of art as a source of inspiration, healing and hope, and we look forward to showcasing the museum’s global collections through a new lens and providing new spaces for learning and engagement with the reopening of the full campus.”

The Martin Building has been fully restored and renovated throughout, which includes realizing Ponti’s original vision for the 7th floor, expanding gallery space and offering visitor access to stunning city and mountain views.  The transformed Martin Building will showcase the museum’s encyclopedic collections from around the world and throughout history, while putting its nationally recognized educational programming at the center of the campus.

This October will also mark the opening of the museum’s new Sie Welcome Center, which connects the Hamilton and Martin buildings, and was designed by Machado Silvetti and Fentress Architects, with a nod to Gio Ponti’s original vision. The new building, crowned by an elliptical glass event and program space, visually connects the campus, creating improved spaces for ticketing and guest services, as well as two new dining options. The lower level houses a purpose-built art conservation and technical studies laboratory. 

Inside the Martin Building, the new Jana & Fred Bartlit Learning & Engagement Center accommodates engagement for all ages, including space for student and community exhibitions, outdoor terraces, school and group reception, adult and youth classes, and artist interactions. These dynamic interactive spaces were designed by Mexico City-based design team Esrawe + Cadena with an eye toward playful, creative and inspired flexible spaces for varied programming.

As part of the transformation of the Martin Building, the collection galleries have been updated and reconceived with a commitment to telling more inclusive stories, including bringing in more contemporary artist and community voices to provide increased societal and historical contexts. Collection galleries housed in the Martin Building include new Design galleries and a reimagined Northwest Coast and Alaska Native gallery on level 2; reconceived Indigenous Arts of North America galleries on level 3; a new vision for Latin American Art and Art of the Ancient Americas galleries on level 4; newly installed Asian Art galleries on level 5; new European Art Before 1800 galleries, Textile Art and Fashion galleries and Photography galleries on level 6; and new and expanded Western American Art galleries on level 7, marking the first time that the DAM’s renowned Western collection has been presented in one space. Upon the opening of the Martin Building and Sie Welcome Center, the entire museum campus will also include bilingual art labels in English and Spanish.

Reclaiming space that was utilized as art storage for the last decade, the new Bonfils-Stanton Foundation Gallery, a 6,500-square-foot renovated gallery on level 1 in the Martin Building, will feature special exhibitions drawn primarily from the DAM’s collections. This space will open with the thematic exhibition ReVisión: Art in the Americas, which brings together works from the museum’s internationally acclaimed Latin American and Art of the Ancient Americas collections. From ancient artifacts to contemporary painting and sculpture, the exhibition places 180 works in dialogue to tell a fuller story of the region’s cultural heritage with gallery design by IKD of Boston and San Francisco. ReVisión: Art in the Americas and all Martin Building galleries opening in October will be included in general museum admission.

The Martin Building is named in honor of Denver Art Museum Board Chairman Lanny Martin and his wife Sharon Martin, who made the lead gift of $25 million for the $150 million construction and renovation project. City voters approved the Elevate Denver Bonds in 2017, which provided $35.5 million for crucial safety and infrastructure upgrades. The museum has matched public investment dollars with privately raised funds at a three-to-one ratio.

“This campus transformation ensures that the Denver Art Museum continues to serve as a beacon of creativity for the widest possible audience for decades to come,” said Lanny Martin, Chair of the Board of Trustees. “We are incredibly grateful for the support of all of the project’s donors, Elevate Denver Bond supporters and the greater cultural community, whose generosity ensures that the museum’s iconic campus will be a Denver destination for audiences of all ages.”

Since the opening of the Hamilton Building in 2006, the museum has served as a catalyst for the redevelopment of the surrounding Golden Triangle Creative District. Over the past decade, three adjacent museums have made their home in the neighborhood, creating a downtown cultural hub: the Clyfford Still Museum (2011); History Colorado Center (2012); and the relocated Kirkland Museum of Fine and Decorative Arts (2018). At the same time, the Golden Triangle has continued to develop new residential and commercial properties as well as independent art galleries, restaurants and retail, creating a highly trafficked, walkable neighborhood with arts and culture at its core.

Martin Building + Sie Welcome Center Design

Designed by Italian architect Gio Ponti and Denver-based James Sudler Associates, the Martin Building opened in 1971. Its seven-story silhouette is one of the first-ever high-rise art museums and is the only completed building in North America by the renowned Italian modernist Gio Ponti.

The building’s renovation and upgrades were designed by Machado Silvetti and Fentress Architects, and constructed by Saunders Construction, Inc. The work includes the addition of 33,328 square feet of new gallery and public space, fulfilling Ponti’s original vision for visitor access to stunning 7th-floor views; the addition of skylights that reveal new angles of the building’s design; and exterior improvements such as lighting and revitalization of the glass tiles on the building’s façade. The renovation also includes updating environmental and other key systems with the latest technology. The completed project received LEED Silver certification. Infrastructure and safety upgrades include a new elevator core, which adds two additional elevators and a transparent public staircase for improved visitor flow, along with updated mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems, new windows, new flooring and new exterior wall insulation.

The 50,000-square-foot Sie Welcome Center’s second story façade is comprised of a series of 25-foot-tall, 8-foot-wide curved structural glass panels with insulated glazing—an unprecedented feat of engineering and the first building to use curved panels in this way. The welcome center serves as an entry point and a destination for visitors and seamlessly connects all aspects of the museum campus.

“The Martin Building is a treasured work in the Denver Art Museum’s collection, and the chance to celebrate Gio Ponti’s legacy and realize elements of his design through its renovation and restoration was a thrill for our team,” said Jorge Silvetti, Principal at Machado Silvetti. “To create the new Sie Welcome Center in the architecturally rich context of Denver’s Golden Triangle Creative District, it was critical for us to design a structure that was simultaneously in dialogue with the vibrant visual language of Ponti and Studio Libeskind’s designs, while also providing connection to the museum. With its elliptical shape that is approachable from all angles, and transparent glass façade, the Sie Welcome Center is an inviting and glowing beacon to greet all visitors.”

Opening Events

A series of opening events will accompany the opening of the new Martin Building to celebrate the completed campus and thank the community for their support. An Opening Day celebration will take place on Sunday, Oct. 24. The all-day celebration will include free admission to all, as well as creative activities and moments for visitors of all ages. More details to be announced closer to opening day.

Museum members will have the opportunity for a pre-opening experience. Members-only previews will take place on Oct. 21, 22 and 23. The Martin Building, Sie Welcome Center and both The Ponti and Café Gio will be open to all members those days. Details and booking information will be sent to members directly. Information on becoming a museum member or renewing a membership is available here.

On the evening of Friday, October 15, is the museum’s Unveiled Opening Gala. This ticketed fundraising event will gather artists, patrons and trustees on a night unlike any other. Cocktail hour and dinner in the spectacular new Sturm Grand Pavilion will be included with the inspiring and unexpected program. Proceeds will support ongoing museum programming. See the museum website for more information on Unveiled.

BNA’s New Concourse D Receives Top Award

Southeast Chapter of the American Association of Airport Executives Names Concourse D ‘Commercial Airport Architectural Project of the Year’

Less than a year after opening, Nashville International Airport’s state-of-the-art Concourse D has earned airport industry acclaim for excellence. The Southeast Chapter of the American Association of Airport Executives (SEC-AAAE) this week announced Concourse D as the recipient of its 2021 Commercial Airport Architectural Project of the Year Award, an industry-recognized mark of distinction for BNA’s fourth major concourse.

BNA received the award among peers at SEC-AAAE’s annual members conference in Savannah, Georgia. SEC-AAAE is the largest chapter of the American Association of Airport Executives and represents airport management professionals in 12 Southeastern states, including Tennessee, in addition to the Virgin Islands and the District of Columbia.

“We are honored to receive this award from SEC-AAAE and are immensely proud of the Concourse D project,” said Doug Kreulen, BNA’s president and CEO. “This award represents more than two years of hard work that resulted in a multi-faceted modern concourse for BNA travelers. It also signifies $55 million in contracts for small, minority and woman-owned business enterprises (SMWBEs), a 72 percent local workforce and a commitment to sustainability. It’s BNA at its best, and we thank our SEC-AAAE colleagues for this tremendous recognition.”

Concourse D is a major component of BNA® Vision, the dynamic expansion and renovation plan for Nashville International Airport. The $292 million facility opened in July 2020 with 115,000 square feet of new terminal space, six domestic aircraft gates operated by Southwest Airlines, compelling public art displays and a variety of customer conveniences. It was built in tandem with a 200,000-square-foot terminal expansion that added new ticketing and baggage claim space to the north and south ends of the central terminal, a 136,000-square-foot renovation of existing terminal space and an 11,000 square-foot central utility plant.

This award from SEC AAAE comes only three months after Concourse D received another noteworthy recognition: LEED Silver certification from the U.S. Green Building Council for green design and construction. Upon achieving LEED Silver, Concourse D became one of only nine newly constructed airport facilities in the world to attain this distinction under USGBC’s rigorous LEED v4 standards.

Traveler amenities and special features include high ceilings, two compelling public art installations, art cases showcasing selections from BNA’s permanent collection, Wi-Fi, restrooms, a mother’s room, an indoor service animal relief area, compelling airfield views, dynamic electrochromic technology that blocks out excessive heat and sunlight, and new terrazzo flooring. Additional space is available for future concessions.

Concourse D was built by Hensel Phelps Construction Co. and designed by Fentress Architects. Other key partners included Corgan (master architect for BNA® Vision), I. C. Thomasson Associates Inc. (mechanical, electrical and plumbing engineer), Smith Seckman Reid Inc. (commissioning agent) and S&ME (civil engineer/landscape designer).

The Concourse D and Terminal Wings Expansion was the first major terminal expansion project completed as part of the ongoing BNA® Vision program, which is dramatically remaking the airport to meet future demand and existing needs. Other BNA® Vision projects to be completed by 2023 will include a larger central terminal, a state-of-the-art International Arrivals Facility, expanded central security checkpoint, an on-airport hotel, top-to-bottom terminal renovation, a variety of new dining, retail and service amenities and a massive terminal parking garage complex.

Source: Nashville International Airport®

Fentress Architects’ Director of Sustainability, Deborah Lucking, Elevated to AIA College of Fellows

Fentress Architects is proud to announce that the American Institute of Architects (AIA) has elevated Director of Sustainability Deborah Lucking, FAIA, to the prestigious 2021 College of Fellows, the AIA’s highest honor awarded to members who have made significant contributions to the architecture profession. With 102 member-architects elevated to the College of Fellows this year, Deborah was the only AIA Colorado member to receive this honor.

“Deborah has single-handedly elevated and advanced discourse around sustainable design, leading Fentress Architects to constantly reach beyond our past achievements to place our firm’s work at the forefront of green and resilient design for large, energy-demanding structures,” said Fentress Architects Principal in Charge of Design Curtis Fentress, FAIA, RIBA. “She is not only an important part of our firm, but to all the communities where she works.”

Since joining Fentress Architects in 1996, Deborah has successfully contributed to the design for award-winning projects including the LEED Platinum Green Square Complex in Raleigh, NC; the Denver Art Museum Martin Building Renovation and Sie Welcome Center in Denver, CO; the net-zero energy Contra Costa County Administration Building in Martinez, CA; the Miami Beach Convention Center in Miami Beach, FL; the Colorado Convention Center Phase II Expansion in Denver, CO; and the Concourse D and Terminal Wings Expansion at Nashville International Airport.

Throughout her 40+-year career, Deborah has been an advocate for sustainable, high-performance buildings and spaces that enhance user experience, contribute to the larger community, and model exceptional design. Her leadership in practice has resulted in the over 24 million square feet of diverse building types—including airports, courthouses, convention centers, and museums—designed for sustainability and resiliency through a variety of programs. Deborah has helped Fentress project teams achieve over 40 LEED certifications, including 18 LEED Gold and 5 LEED Platinum.

“I am deeply honored to have been elevated to the American Institute of Architects College of Fellows,” said Deborah Lucking, FAIA. “Sustainable design is all about good design that improves the human experience; I am committed to delivering good design and creating a better tomorrow for future generations. I have been extraordinarily fortunate to have been able to work on projects that have significant impacts, both locally and nationally. Most of all, I have benefited from the inspiration and collaborations among my peers, clients, and the communities where I have worked, and for this I am both grateful and humbled.”

As a founding member of the AIA Colorado Knowledge Community on Resilience (now the Committee for the Environment) and a past Chair of a LEED for Airports Working Group, Deborah is actively sharing her insight within the practice to reach wider audiences.

GSA Unveils Design for New Federal Courthouse in Huntsville

ATLANTA, GA—The U.S. General Services Administration today unveiled design renderings for the new federal courthouse in Huntsville, Alabama, in partnership with the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Alabama.

Soon to be a prominent feature in Huntsville’s historic downtown, the three-story courthouse with a walkout basement will include five courtrooms and six judges’ chambers, as well as workspace for the U.S. Marshals Service, the U.S. Attorney’s Office, and the U.S Probation and Pretrial Services.

The new courthouse’s design is neoclassical in style, with a large pedimented entry portico flanked by gently arcing symmetrical wings. The design incorporates modern security, sustainability and technological features necessary for a 21st-century federal courthouse, while integrating classical organizational, proportional and design elements. In addition, the design features a large formal public lawn with symmetrical plantings that will help both to create a sense of space and to focus the eye towards nearby panoramic views.

“GSA is excited to give the people of Huntsville a glimpse into what their future downtown will look like through this courthouse design,” said Kevin Kerns, Regional Commissioner for GSA’s Public Buildings Service Southeast Sunbelt Region. “GSA strives to provide a state-of-the-art facility that meets the long-term workspace and security needs of our partners in the Northern District of Alabama.”

With an authorized budget of nearly $86 million, construction of the 123,000 square-foot courthouse is anticipated to begin in early 2022 and will take approximately 30 months to complete. The 5-acre property sits at the intersection of Lowe Avenue and Gallatin Street. Steve White of Fentress Architects in Washington, D.C., is the project’s lead designer, and Lee Sims of Studio Scarab Architecture Interiors Planning in Montgomery, Alabama, serves as the courthouse designer. Payne Design Group Architects of Montgomery is providing bridging architectural services.

In addition to the new Huntsville courthouse, construction also continues on a new federal courthouse in Anniston, Alabama. Work on the 63,000 square-foot facility is anticipated to be complete by fall 2021.

Architizer Recognizes Fentress Architects as a Top Architecture Firm in North America in 2021

Honored to be one of 13 firms named Best Firm in North America by Architizer’s inaugural A+ Firm Awards

Fentress Architects was recognized with a Special Mention in “Best in North America” for the inaugural Architizer A+ Firm Awards. Dedicated to celebrating the world’s most innovative AEC firms, the prestigious awards program recognizes talented teams of all sizes, geographies, and specializations that conceptualize, design, and deliver the world’s best architecture.

“We are honored, humbled, and elated to have received this exceptional recognition by Architizer,” said Curtis Fentress, FAIA, RIBA, Principal in Charge of Design at Fentress Architects. “Our commitment to advancing the industry and passion for creating innovative and inspired spaces is deeply rooted in the Fentress culture. This accolade would not have been possible without our team members’ hard work and dedication, as well as the continued support of our clients and partners.”

Since the firm’s 1980 inception, Fentress has been dedicated to designing human-centric, timeless, and inspired public architecture. The firm’s projects have been recognized with over 550 distinctions for design excellence and innovation, including over 110 Design Awards from the American Institute of Architects. Founder Curtis Fentress was the eighth architect in private practice to receive the Thomas Jefferson Award for Public Architecture, which is considered one of the highest awards for public architecture.

Fentress’ diverse $43 billion portfolio ranges from expansive public environments such as airports, convention centers, government centers, and educational facilities, to more intimate spaces like chapels. The firm is internationally known for its designs for the Denver International Airport in Denver, CO; the Miami Beach Convention Center in Miami Beach, FL; the Tom Bradley International Terminal at LAX in Los Angeles, CA; the National Museum of the Marine Corps in Quantico, VA; and the Clark County Government Center in Las Vegas, NV. The firm recently completed the new Johnson County Courthouse in Olathe, KS; the new Concourse D at Nashville International Airport in Nashville, TN; the Denver Art Museum North Building Renovation and Welcome Center in Denver, CO; and the Concourse E Extension at Portland International Airport in Portland, OR.

Fentress is currently designing over 5.7 million square feet of projects including the new South Terminal C at Orlando International Airport in Orlando, FL; the Fred D. Thompson Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Nashville, TN; the Mickey Leland International Terminal at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston, TX; the Terminal Lobby and International Arrivals Facility at Nashville International Airport in Nashville, TN; and the Royal Norwegian Embassy Renovation in Washington, DC.

To learn more about the Architizer A+ Firm Awards and to view Fentress’ select portfolio, please visit: https://architizer.com/firms/fentress-architects/

Building Design+Construction Ranks Fentress Architects Among Nation’s Top Architecture Firms

#5 Convention Centers + Conference Centers

#8 Airport Terminal

#10 Museums

Fentress Architects has ranked as one of the top architecture firms in Building Design + Construction Magazine’s 2020 Giants 400 Report. Internationally known for innovative, award-winning design of diverse building types—including airports, museums, convention centers, civic and government buildings, laboratories, and higher education facilities—Fentress ranked #36 on the Top 155 Architecture Firms list, progressing nine places from its 2019 ranking at #45.

In addition to the firm’s recognition as one of the Top Architecture Firms for 2020, Fentress, whose portfolio features over 40 convention center designs including the recently completed LEED Silver Miami Beach Convention Center, is ranked #5 in the Convention Centers / Conference Centers sector. With over $23.8 Billion and 115 Million square feet in aviation projects, the firm is ranked #8 in the Airport Terminal sector. Fentress also landed #22 in the overall Cultural Facilities sector, #10 in the Museums and Galleries category, #63 in the Office – Buildings / Core+Shell sector, and #98 in Office – All Building Work.

“We are proud that our firm was recognized for our continuous efforts to elevate design excellence in public architecture,” said Fentress Architects Principal in Charge of Design Curtis Fentress, FAIA, RIBA. “Our ability to drive growth throughout the industry reflects our team’s unwavering commitment to innovation, along with the collaborative efforts of our clients and project partners.”

Miami Beach Convention Center. Photo: ©Tom Clark

Over the past year, Fentress’ projects achieved major milestones including the completion of four world-class projects: the new Johnson County Courthouse in Olathe, KS; the new Concourse D and Terminal Wings at Nashville International Airport® in Nashville, TN, which also became one of only five airport facilities in the US to achieve LEED v4 Silver certification; the Terminal Balancing and Concourse E Extension at Portland International Airport in Portland, OR; the Denver Art Museum North Building Renovation and Anna and John J. Sie Welcome Center in Denver, CO; and the Miami Beach Convention Center Expansion and Renovation in Miami Beach, FL, which also achieved LEED Silver certification.

Denver International Airport Passenger Terminal Complex. Credit © Ellen Jaskol

As a testament to Fentress’ recognition, the firm garnered 16 awards for design excellence and innovation in 2020 alone, including the American Institute of Architecture (AIA) Colorado’s Twenty-Five Year Award for the Denver International Airport as well as the AIA Western Mountain Region’s Twenty-Five Year Award for the Clark County Government Center. The Miami Beach Convention Center landed a Silver Award in the Façade category of the 2020 World Architecture News (WAN) Awards and a 2020 BEST Award in the Serve category from the International Design Association’s (IIDA) Rocky Mountain Chapter.

Rendering of the Royal Norwegian Embassy Chancery Renovation. 

Positioned for a strong 2021, Fentress is anticipating the upcoming completion of the Fred D. Thompson Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Nashville, TN as well as the Royal Norwegian Embassy Chancery Renovation in Washington, DC. Additionally, the firm is working on the new South Terminal C at Orlando International Airport, the Terminal Lobby and International Arrivals Facility at Nashville International Airport, the new Mickey Leland International Terminal at George Bush Intercontinental Airport, the U.S. Courthouse Huntsville, Alabama, and the National Museum of Intelligence and Special Operations—just to name a few.

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